doakonsult

Consulting.Philosophy.Travel

  • There are three types of people in the world, those who don't know what's happening, those who wonder what's happening and those on the streets that make things happen.

Posts Tagged ‘death’

Dust thou art…

Posted by Raunak Mahajan on July 7, 2013

pyre

Haridwar is one of the holiest places for Hindus. It is here that the river Ganges descends from the Himalayas and begins its journey along the great northern plains of India. Millions of pilgrims visit Haridwar every year to bathe in holy water of Ganges and wash away their sins. It is here, by the banks of the river, that thousands of Hindus immerse ashes of their loved ones into the Ganges and perform final rites of their relatives. And this is a scene that draws me to the river banks frequently.

Most people visit the holy banks to take a dip in the water or pray at the temples there. Not me. I climb onto an over-bridge and spend more than a few minutes looking down at the portion of the banks dedicated to immersing ashes into the gushing river and priests performing ritual prayers for the dead. I see mourning relatives fold their hands in prayer as they let the remains of their loved ones unite with the divine river. And I think to myself, someday, someone will do the same for me. I will be that ash that dissolves into insignificance in the mighty river. And just like that, I will be gone.

It is this humbling experience that draws me to the Ganges. It is therapy. It makes me realize how inconsequential the things that bother my mind are. And this realization is an awakening, a rejuvenating experience that lifts my spirits unlike anything else. Last rites have a mystic spiritualism attached to them. I just found it.

Advertisements

Posted in Philosophy | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

A Lesson in Life

Posted by Raunak Mahajan on January 6, 2013

“People with interesting lives have no vanity.They swap cities.Invest in projects with no guarantees. Are interested in people who are opposite of them. Resign without having another job in sight. Accept an invitation to do something they haven’t before. Are prepared to change their favorite color, favorite dish. They start from zero countless times. They do not get frightened of getting old. They climb on stage, shear their hair, do craziness for love, purchase one-way tickets.”

Martha Madeiros

I learnt a lesson last week. Unfortunately, as in many cases, the lesson came a little too late. I was reminded that the present is the only thing we can be certain of. The future is nothing but a hope. It may or may not get realized. Live as if there is no tomorrow. Do things as if they were the last things you will ever do.

I moved into my apartment a little over a month back. The apartment was shown to me by the caretaker. A couple of phone calls with the landlord, Mr.Sharma and the deal was made. I shifted my stuff and started enjoying my new home. Every now and then I would talk to the landlord over phone expressing few concerns regarding faulty plumbing or electricity. And everytime, Mr.Sharma would take immediate steps to ensure my comfort and convenience. In a country like India, finding such a cooperative landlord is very rare and I felt blessed indeed. It just amazed me how  he, without having met me in person, allowed me to lease his house and even went out of his way to make me feel at home in a strange town. Our telephonic conversations were very friendly indeed and I sensed a spiritual connection with the jovial spirit.

Every week I would resolve to meet him the coming Sunday but end up being in office and put off the meeting to next Sunday. Five such Sundays passed. Monday 8:30 am, I opened my car door when I heard the caretaker’s voice from behind me, “Raunak, Mr.Sharma is no more. He passed away this morning due to a sudden heart attack.”

I rushed to Mr.Sharma’s house. I finally met him. He didn’t talk. My heart cried.

Posted in Philosophy | Tagged: , , | 9 Comments »

A Beautiful Short Story: The Appointment in Samarra

Posted by Raunak Mahajan on September 23, 2012

This story appeared as an epigraph for the novel, “Appointment in Samarra” by John O’Hara. It is W. Somerset Maugham’s retelling of an old story. First, here’s an interesting historical fact about the meaning of Samarra. Medieval Islamic writers believed that the name “Samarra” is derived from the Arabic phrase “Sarra man ra’a”, which translates to “A joy for all who see”. Later when the city declined the name changed to “Sa’a man ra’a”, which translates to “A sadness for all who see”. Eventually the two names merged to its current form Samarra. (credit : Wikipedia)

The Appointment in Samarra

“A merchant in Baghdad sends his servant to the marketplace for provisions. Shortly, the servant comes home white and trembling and tells him that in the marketplace he was jostled by a woman, whom he recognized as Death, and she made a threatening gesture. Borrowing the merchant’s horse, he flees at top speed to Samarra, a distance of about 75 miles, where he believes Death will not find him. The merchant then goes to the marketplace and finds Death, and asks why she made the threatening gesture. She replies, “That was not a threatening gesture, it was only a start of surprise. I was astonished to see him in Baghdad, for I had an appointment with him tonight in Samarra.”

A beautiful tale from a magical and mystical land. Alas, what have we done to Mesopotamia!

Posted in Philosophy | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments »

 
%d bloggers like this: